New

Solidarity Box

SKU: 50164

We've put together a collection of some of our best-selling products from small-farmer cooperatives around the world. Whether you buy a box for yourself or give one as a gift to friends and family this holiday season, you are taking a stand in solidarity with small farmers worldwide.

New

Solidarity Box

SKU: 50164

We've put together a collection of some of our best-selling products from small-farmer cooperatives around the world. Whether you buy a box for yourself or give one as a gift to friends and family this holiday season, you are taking a stand in solidarity with small farmers worldwide.

$50.00

Each box contains:

  • (1) 10z bag Organic Love Buzz drip grind coffee
  • (1) Box of 20ct Organic Black Tea
  • (1) Box of 20ct Organic Rooibos Tea
  • (1) Organic Baking Cocoa 8oz canister
  • (1) Organic Dark Chocolate Mint Crunch 67% cacao 2.8oz chocolate bar
  • (1) Organic Panama Extra Dark 80% cacao 2.8oz chocolate bar
  • (1) Box Palestinian Medjool Dates 17.6oz
  • (1) Organic Semi-Sweet Chocolate Chips 55% cacao 10oz bag.

Box also contains an insert with information on each farmer producer group.

The Producer Groups Behind These Products

PRODECOOP · Nicaragua
Organic Love Buzz Coffee
PRODECOOP is an umbrella cooperative organization that brings together 38 village-level cooperatives from Esteli, Madriz and Nueva Segovia in northern Nicaragua. It is made up of about 1,000 small farmers—30% of whom are women The cooperative provides services such as agricultural extension services, training, marketing, credit, capacity building of cooperatives, coffee quality programs, and social development projects. PRODECOOP provides continuous education of its members to expand each member’s ability to be a strong farmer and a leader in her or his co-op and community. Since 1992, PRODECOOP has exported directly to international markets in Europe, the United States, and Japan.

CONACADO · Dominican Republic
Organic Dark Chocolate Mint Crunch
Over the past 23 years, CONACADO has grown from 700 members organized in 3 locations, to over 9,500 members organized in 9 locations with 142 local community associations throughout the Dominican Republic. Each of the 9 groups or “bloques” has a similar organizational structure: an Assembly of Delegates, with two delegates per association, that meets once a month to report on work plan progress at the community level; a Governing Board that meets once a month to execute the work plan; and an Administrative Committee that meets once a week to follow up on the work plan to make sure it is going as it should. A General Assembly meets once a year to approve work plans and decide how Fair Trade premiums will be used. The co-operative’s success in quality improvement and marketing means that 70% of their cacao is sold as high quality fermented beans, primarily to European niche markets: Organic, Biodynamic, and Fair Trade.Today, CONACADO members produce approximately 25% of the cacao exported from the Dominican Republic and the organization has become a powerful alternative for small-scale producers.

COCABO · Panama
Organic Panama Extra Dark Chocolate
The Cacao Co-operative of Bocatoreña (COCABO) is an organization of 1,500 small-scale cacao farmers, mostly of the Naso and Ngöbe peoples, in the Bocas del Toro province of Panama. Founded in 1952, COCABO is the oldest cooperative in Panama.Along with marketing cacao and implementing Fair Trade projects in local communities, the cooperative supports its members through technical assistance to increase crop yields and quality. The organization has diversified its business through sales of bananas and pineapples, ownership of five hardware stores and the operation of a saw mill. Located on the outskirts of the Amistad Forest Reserve, COCABO offers crucial support for economic and community development through alternatives to traditional economic activities that have often led to deforestation in this critical habitat.

CACVRA · Peru
Organic Semi-Sweet Chocolate Chips
The Agrarian Coffee Cooperative of the Apurimac River Valley (CACVRA) was formed in 1969 to market coffee for small-scale farmers in Peru. In the 1980’s, the co-op and surrounding communities in the remote Apurimac Valley were severely impacted by the social and political conflict occurring in Peru’s Ayacucho Province. Within the last several years, CACVRA has recovered to re-establish strong export volumes of coffee and has also become a significant producer and exporter of organic cacao to international markets. CACVRA has 1,900 producers;the average size of producer farms is 3-10 hectares. In order to unite geographically diverse communities, CACVRA has its own vehicles to transport cocoa beans to central fermentation centers.

Wupperthal Cooperative · South Africa
Organic Rooibos
In 1998 against all odds, Wupperthal Original Rooibos Cooperative was established. Wupperthal is a democratically organized group of small-scale farmers who have grown Rooibos in South Africa for generations. The Wupperthal farmers were pushed off the most fertile land in the 1800’s and later endured the apartheid era. They now grow food in the very dry, rocky soil of the Cedarberg Mountains which presents a big challenge for most of their crops. With Rooibos, however, the slower growth and lower production has resulted in notably higher quality tea compared to plantation Rooibos which is grown on the most fertile lands. Today, 98% of rooibos production is grown on plantations with white landowners, making Wupperthal a true gem in a rocky landscape.

Potong Tea Garden · India
Organic Black Tea
Once a colonial plantation, the Potong Tea Garden came about through the efforts of the pioneering group: Tea Promoters of India. The Potong Tea Garden is collectively run by its workers and paving a stronger, more democratic path forward for the community. If this revolutionary new model is successful, not only will it generate significant improvements for the garden’s 350 workers and their families, but the seeds planted in Darjeeling, India, could help spark a badly needed transformation of the tea industry. We believe partnerships such as these hold the key to the future of a fair and equitable tea system.

PARC · West Bank
Palestinian Medjool Dates
The Palestinian Agrictural Relief Committee (PARC) was founded in 1983 by agronomists and veterinarians in order to serve farmers in the agricultural sector of the West Bank and Gaza. Today PARC works with 41 cooperatives, each made up of anywhere from 20-80 members. These groups grow olives (for oil), couscous, almonds, dates, and other products. Small-scale farmers, through their cooperatives, share best practices for planting, fertilizing, plowing, pruning, harvesting, and packing products. PARC assists the cooperatives by providing technical assistance, overseeing quality control, preparing goods for export, and shipping products to different countries. It is committed to transparency and accountability. PARC also helps to supply water infrastructure for farmers as well as plants and seedlings when necessary. PARC runs three agricultural training institutes for college graduates. It provides social services for women, children and families through community-based organizations.



map of solidarity box products